artssake:

Irving Harper paper sculpture

1 year ago 86 notes

hahamagartconnect:

HERO

…is artist Miguel Endara’s portrait of his Dad’s face. Composed of approximately 3.2 million black ink dots, using a single Sakura Pigma Micron pen (nib size 005, 0.20 mm). The total number of dots was determined by muliplying the average stippling speed of this piece, 4.25 dots per second, by the amount of time logged in, 210 hours.

Not only was the ‘Making of Video’ nominated on Vimeo, but Miguel himself blogs about the process on his personal Tumblr. I really like the post where he shows you how he rigged the camera up in order to capture the moment.

Hero
pen and ink / stippling
2012

*image via the artist website

(via lasersigns)

1 year ago 63 notes

vilehumanity:

My plug!

(via deadcitykid)

1 year ago 344 notes

hahamagartconnect:

HERO

…is artist Miguel Endara’s portrait of his Dad’s face. Composed of approximately 3.2 million black ink dots, using a single Sakura Pigma Micron pen (nib size 005, 0.20 mm). The total number of dots was determined by muliplying the average stippling speed of this piece, 4.25 dots per second, by the amount of time logged in, 210 hours.

Not only was the ‘Making of Video’ nominated on Vimeo, but Miguel himself blogs about the process on his personal Tumblr. I really like the post where he shows you how he rigged the camera up in order to capture the moment.

Hero
pen and ink / stippling
2012

*image via the artist website

1 year ago 63 notes

dolibertino:

O cotidiano de Daim

1 year ago 10 notes

2ndwnd:

signage prototype for an architecture office #2ndwnd #laseretch #3form #resinpanels (Taken with Instagram)

1 year ago 3 notes

lafilleblanc:

Christoph Freimann,

Maestro, 1996, Messing, Lack, 71 x 40 x 50 cm.

(via)

(via vative)

1 year ago 5 notes

vative:

Haegue Yang, Voice and Wind, 2010

HAEGUE YANG, born in 1971 in Seoul, is one of the leading artists of her generation; YANG has participated in numerous exhibitions internationally, and represented South Korea – after long consideration – at the 53rd Venice Biennial where she surprised visitors with complex installations, sculptures and videos in which their atmospheric intensity appear equally poetic and conceptual.

In her architectural interventions, and sculptures, she often employs commercially manufactured venetian blinds to explore hidden spaces that might be considered marginal, but to the artist constitute profound backdrops for understanding vulnerable sites where informal development can occur. In these works, artificial approximations of sensual experiences such as heat, light, and humidity conjure other places, other people, comfort, distress, the familiar, or perhaps something profoundly forgotten.

Ranging from industrial fan to fog machines and scent dispensers, these appliances clicked on and off at intervals, triggered by the movements of visitors, releasing faint wafts of vapour and altering the stability of the blinds as suspended barriers. Bearing no particular relation to one another, the objects appeared as an oddly animated group, connected by a sprawling system of wires giving visitors an immersive sensory experiences.

1 year ago 14 notes

weldonarts:

In the Midst of Living: Interview with Artist, NohJColey

Prolific street artist NohJColey has his first solo exhibition opening at Weldon Arts on September 7th. We sat down with the artist to get his take on art and the world as he sees it through his paintings.

WA: A few months ago you said you were thinking of quitting street art. Why?


NJC: Probably not quit, but focus more on graffiti. With my work I am trying to find a different voice. Why put so much time into something that only lasts a week? I don’t feel like I’m part of a community doing street art.

WA: Is time a major concern?


NJC: We’re not going to live forever, so I have to think about how I use my time. Is it worth my time? I even think about that when creating gallery work.


WA: The work you create is very personal. A lot of portraiture. Why?


NJC: The portrait is the easiest way to create something that viewers can relate to. People see text and writing all day and can ignore that, but faces are personal. People are the same and different at the same time and I am exploring those differences, portrait by portrait.


WA: What do you want to communicate with your work?


NJC: Respect your neighbors and don’t jump to conclusions. Get to know people and who you share the earth with.

1 year ago 9 notes

createsomethingoriginal:

Peter Root

1 year ago 2 notes

devidsketchbook:

SET FIRE TO RAIN

ADELE portrait | RED aka Hong Yi - I’m doing a 4 part project involving the 4 basic elements: fire, water, wind and earth.

So for FIRE, I chose to do ADELE’s portrait (also, I wanted to do a portrait of an Brit after the London Olympics!). Her song ‘Set Fire to the Rain’ inspired me to use candles and fire as my painting materials…but why?

To me, ADELE was probably singing about the pain of a lost relationship. Rain may be a metaphor for her tears she cried, and she is setting fire to it to burn and destroy her pain. I’ve used blue candles to represent tears, and by setting fire to them, they melt and flow into each other, forming a portrait of ADELE.

[via mymodernmet]

1 year ago 640 notes

devidsketchbook:

PIRACY

The works, created by Moreno De TurcoMirco Pagano

Supervisors: Francesco Guerrera, Nicola Lampugnani 
Producer: Federico Fornasari
Fotografo: FM Photographers
Mockup Artist: Marco Simula, Moreno De Turco

more about the project here

1 year ago 156 notes

2ndwnd:

sneek peak #2ndwnd #laseretch #oak #portraits #details #halftone #dotsonstuff (Taken with Instagram at 2ndwnd)

1 year ago 3 notes

vimural:

Armenian Street wall’s painting has tapped deep into the minds of Penangites and visitors, provoking a fascinating and creative response. People take pictures of themselves chasing the children down the road, some go for a ride together, and some add captions about their childhood memories. There is no fixed meaning; the artwork is open for interpretations, recreations and narratives. This is street art at its best, when it stops being an individual painting and becomes part of the public imagination.

more info:
zachas.com
facebook.com/Ernestzachas

1 year ago 3 notes